Saturation of Alcohol Advertising in State of Origin a Disgrace

Tomorrow’s first State of Origin match signals the beginning of young Australians being exposed to the mass alcohol advertising to come over the State of Origin games says co-chair of the National Alliance for Action on Alcohol (NAAA) Committee Dr John Crozier.

“It is shameful that children continue to be exposed to harmful alcohol advertising as families tune their televisions to live sporting events like the State of Origin,” said Dr Crozier, also Chair of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Trauma Committee.

“Allowing our sporting heroes to be walking billboards for alcohol products during prime time viewing encourages children to start drinking at a younger age and at more harmful levels when they reach adulthood.

“Alcohol advertising has never been as pervasive, as inventive, and as well-resourced as it is now. There is an urgent need for effective regulation that prioritises the health of young people, and supports public health efforts to change Australia’s harmful drinking culture.”

The Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice was reviewed earlier this year and continued to allow alcohol advertising before 8.30pm during live broadcasts of sporting events.

“The Australian Government has continuously failed to end the unhealthy link between alcohol sponsorship and sport and as a result children are exposed to an ever increasing rate of alcohol advertising,” said Dr Crozier.

A recent survey conducted by the Foundation of Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) shows 60% of Australians believe alcohol sponsorship should be banned from sport and 70% believe alcohol advertising should be banned on television before 8:30pm.

Protecting children from alcohol advertising and sponsorship is one action of NAAA’s 4-point plan to prevent alcohol harm. NAAA hopes this 4-point plan speaks to politicians in the upcoming Federal Election to take action in reducing alcohol harms.

“Commercial interests have been prioritised over expert advice and community concerns, and it is time for the next Government to step in and acknowledge the failure of self-regulation and the need for legislated controls.

“A whole-of-system review that considers the effect of alcohol advertising on young people across all mediums is required, and the NAAA is calling for an immediate end to the Code of Practice loophole which allows alcohol advertising during sporting events before 8.30pm.”

ENDS

To arrange an interview with Dr Crozier please contact: Amy Kimber – 0437 144 050

Please click here for the PDF of the media release

Federal Budget: Hope for the next generation

The Federal Budget released today shows the Government is taking positive steps to address the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) rates in Australia.

Investing in FASD prevention shows the Government is committed to lowering the FASD rates to improve quality of life for the next generation. A national register would go a long way to further supporting this initiative.

“FASD is a life sentence for those born with it – there is no cure,” said National Alliance for Action on Alcohol (NAAA) co-chair and Chair of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Trauma Committee Dr John Crozier.

“FASD devastates families and communities. It can have major impacts on children’s intellectual ability and behaviours, putting pressure on health care services,” said Dr Crozier.

“This initiative is aimed at three key aspects of FASD: clinician education, prevention and research. This support is key to prevent FASD by empowering women with the right information to make educated decisions about the risks of drinking alcohol while pregnant,” says Dr Crozier.

“The clinical network and information resources that will be made available to clinicians are an important step in improving patient outcomes and helping clinicians better understand how FASD affects their patients,” Dr Crozier said.

“Allocation of funds in tonight’s budget is an important step in the right direction, but it won’t solve the FASD problem in Australia,” said Dr Crozier.

NAAA calls on the Government to establish and fund a central register of people diagnosed with fetal alcohol, similar to the Australian Cerebral Palsy Register. Action should also include comprehensive steps to reduce harmful drinking throughout the community.

Alcohol related items in the Federal Budget will be reviewed over the coming week by NAAA.

ENDS

TO ARRANGE AN INTERVIEW WITH DR JOHN CROZIER PLEASE CONTACT:

Amy Kimber – 0437 144 050

 

Twitter: @ACTIONonALCOHOL

For pdf of media release: 160503 Hope for the next generation